Annual Security Report

The following information is also available in Adobe PDF format for distribution.

October 1, 2009

Safety and Security Information

Safety is an important issue for the Michigan State University community.  Each member of the campus community - students, faculty, and staff - should take an active role in preventing and reporting incidents that jeopardize safety on and around campus.  Please review this information carefully.
Michigan State University, in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, has published this document to provide its students and employees with an overview of the University's security resources, policies, and procedures.  These policies and procedures are subject to change at any time.  A hard copy of this document may be obtained by contacting the Student Life Department at (517) 432-2471, TTY (517) 353-0304, or e-mail stulife@msu.edu.  The University also reports the annual crime statistics contained in this report to the U.S. Department of Education.  A searchable database containing those statistics can be found at http://www.ope.ed.gov/security/.
Campus crime statistics included in this report are gathered from a variety of sources, including campus and local law enforcement agencies and campus officials with significant responsibility for student and campus activities.

This document contains general information about the campus, police and public safety resources, reporting crimes, coordination between law enforcement agencies, fire and medical emergencies, crime prevention, victim support services, the law and University policies, campus facilities, residence hall security, crime statistics, the MSU Policy on Sexual Harassment, and the MSU Alcohol and Other Drug Policy.  It also contains information about alcohol and other drug health risks, drug and alcohol laws and penalties, and campus alcohol and other drug education and counseling resources.

THE CAMPUS

Michigan State University, a pioneer land-grant institution, was founded in 1855. The campus is part of a metropolitan area with a total population of approximately 446,469.  
The curriculum includes more than 200 programs of undergraduate and graduate studies in 17 degree-granting colleges taught by approximately 4,636 faculty and academic staff, and 1,474 graduate assistants.  Approximately 6,084 nonacademic employees support the instructional, research and public service activities of the University as well.  The University campus also hosts an affiliated private law college.

For the 2008 fall semester, 46,648 students were enrolled; 36,337 undergraduates (19,264 women and 17,073 men), 8,489 were graduate students and 1,822 in professional programs.

The property holdings of MSU at East Lansing total 5,192 acres. Of this total, more than 2,000 acres are in existing or planned campus development; the remaining acres are devoted to experimental farms, outlying research facilities, and more than 700 acres of protected natural areas.  There are 580 buildings on the contiguous campus, 48 miles of University-owned two-lane roadways, and 104 miles of sidewalks.

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY POLICE DEPARTMENT

The Michigan State University Police Department was established in 1928.  It currently has 100 full-time employees; 69 are positions for police officers.  Pursuant to Michigan Public Act 120 of 1990 and Michigan State University Ordinances 4.0 and 5.0, the MSU Police Department has law enforcement authority over all property governed by the Michigan State University Board of Trustees.  

The duties of the MSU Police Department employees include police and investigative services, access control, emergency management, fire and occupational safety, parking services, special events management, and traffic engineering on campus.  The Police Department also provides coordinated communication to all areas of the campus in the event of natural disasters or of criminal activity that may endanger students and staff, and conducts educational programs on crime reporting and safety.

Field Services Bureau 355-2221

This area includes both Uniform and Homeland Security & Planning Divisions. The Uniform Division provides police services 24 hours a day, and investigates all criminal incidents occurring on property owned by the University or governed by the Michigan State University Board of Trustees.  MSU Police officers are required to have a bachelor's degree and to complete the training course required of all police officers in Michigan.  MSU Police officers are commissioned under state law and are also deputized.  They have authority to carry firearms and are empowered to make arrests.

The Homeland Security and Planning Division houses Emergency Management, Special Events, and the Access Control Units.  MSU has an Emergency Operations Plan that provides a comprehensive set of guidelines for directing resources before, during, and after campus emergencies and disasters.  The Division is very proactive in training all police officers and the community for emergency preparedness, response, and recovery.

The Special Event and Planning Unit coordinates and assists with planning for any special event on campus that involves the Police Department.  Special events may be anything from a major sporting event to assistance for those needing special needs parking.  This unit currently handles up to 800 special events per year.

The Access Control and Alarm Unit is responsible for the physical security, access control, and alarm monitoring of various buildings on campus.

Operational Support Bureau 355-2222

This area includes the Investigations & Personnel Division and Parking & Technology Division.
The Investigations and Personnel Division houses the Investigations Unit, Personnel Unit, and the Records/Public Information Unit.  The Investigations Unit is responsible for follow up investigations related to crimes which occur on campus.  Detectives have additional training in interview and interrogation techniques, computer forensics, crime scene investigation, polygraph operation, and arson investigation.

The Personnel Unit is responsible for the recruitment and hiring of new police employees, internal affairs, as well as managing police officer training.  MSU Police officers receive over 90 hours of in-service training each year.  In-service training is directed toward the special needs of the University and includes crime prevention and security surveys, domestic assault and workplace violence training, diversity education, computer forensic investigation, crime scene investigation and evidence collection, accident reconstruction, hazardous material awareness and response, K-9 handling, bike and motorcycle patrol, and similar law enforcement functions.  Every officer is trained to provide emergency first aid and CPR.

The Records/Public Information Unit is responsible for police records management, Freedom of Information Act, and public information functions.

The Parking and Technology Division houses the Parking, Business, and Technology Units.  It handles all parking and business related functions. This includes the vehicle office, which maintains the faculty staff and student vehicle registrations, as well as parking services, including parking enforcement, impounds, and visitor parking. The Business Unit oversees the department budgets, accounting, and payroll.

Community Team Policing 353-7214

The MSU Police Department is committed to providing enhanced service to the community by its commitment to Community Team Policing.  Community Team Policing builds and expands upon the community policing philosophy the Department adopted in 1987.

Community Team Policing divides the main campus into four geographic zones with a team assigned to each area.  Each team consists of a team supervisor, two team leaders, a minimum of five officers, and at least two detectives.  The entire team takes ownership of its specific area, and collectively problem solves and develops community-oriented projects and programs.

The Community Police Teams strive to reduce crime in their areas by conducting sexual assault and personal safety seminars aimed at risk avoidance and crime prevention.  These seminars are regularly scheduled in the residence halls and may be requested by groups at any time by contacting the Community Team Policing Coordinator.  Team members also speak at every Parent Orientation Program and to all new freshmen at required orientation sessions before the start of fall semester.  Information about personal and property safety, crime awareness, emergency procedures, and police resources is made available to students through Spartan Life, the MSU Student Handbook; on bulletin boards in every residence hall; in orientation newsletters, housing newsletters, and the campus newspaper, The State News; and on the MSU Police’s web page at http://www.police.msu.edu/.

The MSU Police Department also publishes and distributes various personal safety awareness brochures.  Copies of these brochures may be obtained by contacting the MSU Police’s Community Policing Program Coordinator at 87 Red Cedar Road, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, or by calling (517) 353-7214.

Office Watch and Operation Identification Programs 353-7214

Office Watch is a program designed for the University office buildings.  It establishes a formal network of communication between departments, their employees, and police regarding crime related problems in the office complexes.  Office Watch asks everyone in the building to be the “eyes and ears” of the MSU Police.

Operation Identification is an anti-theft program.  The primary goal is to deter theft, help police recover stolen property, and identify its owner.  Through programs and literature, the MSU Police provide information to the community about recording property descriptors to help facilitate property recovery in case of theft or loss.

Lot Watch 353-7214

Lot Watch is a volunteer student service organization developed by the MSU Police to assist with crime and safety in the student parking areas.  The volunteers work surveillance in parking areas looking for thefts, assaults, and other similar crimes.  Lot Watch has also been utilized in other unique crime surveillance situations.

MSU Police officers support the “Ethical Treatment Guarantee,” which prioritizes the protection of life and property for all citizens and encourages fair treatment and enforcement of the law without bias on the grounds of race, color, nationality, age, sexual orientation, gender, disability, or religion. 

REPORTING CRIMES AND OTHER EMERGENCIES

If you are a victim of a crime or a witness to one, or if you need to report a fire, medical, or other emergency, on or off campus in the Greater Lansing area, DIAL 911.

Criminal activity that represents a threat to students, employees, or campus visitors should be reported to the MSU Police immediately so that the University may issue a warning to the campus community.

In a non-emergency situation, you should report suspicious people or activities, traffic accidents, or potential violations of law to the police agency serving the location where the activity occurs:

MSU POLICE 355-2221
East Lansing Police 351-4220
Lansing Police 483-4600
Meridian Township Police 332-6526

ON-CAMPUS REPORTING OF CRIMES

Crimes should be reported to the MSU Police by the victim, any witnesses, or University officials who become aware of the crime.  Crimes committed by Michigan State University students may also be violations of University regulations governing student conduct and may be reported to The Department of Student Life, at (517) 432-2471, TTY (517) 353-0304.

To make it as convenient as possible for students, employees, and guests to report criminal incidents or other emergencies, the University has an enhanced 911 system for all campus telephones.  This system displays the caller's number and location to the police dispatcher.  In addition, over 140 "Green Light" emergency telephones are located about the campus.  These telephones ring directly to the MSU Police dispatch center.  In addition to providing voice contact, these devices pinpoint the location of the call.

The annual security report includes statistics on the following crimes that have been reported to the MSU Police: murder, non-negligent manslaughter, negligent manslaughter, forcible and nonforcible sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, and hate crimes.  The list of crimes that must be reported as hate crimes include the aforementioned offenses, as well as crimes of larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, destruction, damage, or vandalism of property, and any other crime involving bodily injury that was motivated by the offender’s bias against race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity/national origin, or disability.

The annual security report also includes statistics regarding those crimes that have been reported to campus officials with significant responsibility for student and campus activities.  Those campus officials include: faculty advisors to registered student organizations, head coaches for Intercollegiate Athletics, Director of Intercollegiate Athletics, Executive Director of Intramural Sports, Director of Residence Life, Director of Student Life, Associate Director of Student Life - Judicial Affairs, Assistant Director of Student Life - Greek Affairs, Assistant Director of Student Life – Student Government Advising, Assistant Director of Student Life – Student Activities, Director of Office of Study Abroad, Vice President for Student Affairs and Services, Executive Director of MSU in Dubai, Coordinator of MSU Counseling Center Sexual Assault Crisis and Safety Education Program, Manager of Campus Center, and Manager of the MSU Union.

The University does not have a voluntary confidential reporting system for annual crime statistics.  However, crimes reported on a confidential basis to the above offices are included in the annual report.

COORDINATION WITH OTHER LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES

The MSU Police Department maintains a cooperative relationship with other local, county, and state police agencies. This cooperation includes multi-jurisdictional investigations of alleged crimes, special events coordination, and joint training programs.  An Ingham County Mutual Police Assistance Agreement among Michigan State University and the County of Ingham, the Cities of Lansing, East Lansing, Williamston, Leslie and Mason, the Village of Stockbridge, Lansing Charter Township, and the Charter Township of Meridian permits the respective parties’ police officers to render to each other supplemental police protection in the event of an emergent need or a special police need of a magnitude beyond the capabilities of a single police department.

The University does not formally monitor or record criminal activity by students at off-campus locations.  The MSU Police, however, work closely with the City of East Lansing on issues concerning off-campus groups such as fraternities, sororities, and cooperative living units.  If the University is notified of a situation in which a member of the campus community is the victim of an off-campus crime that represents a threat to MSU students, employees, or visitors, the MSU Police issue a timely warning detailing the incident and providing tips to avoid similar incidents.

In cases of misconduct and criminal acts in East Lansing, complainants are urged to contact the East Lansing Police or other community agencies to help resolve disputes.

FIRE AND MEDICAL EMERGENCIES

If you need to report a fire, medical, or other emergency, on or off campus in the Greater Lansing area, DIAL 911.

In the event of a fire, first-response fire fighting service is provided through the East Lansing Fire Department's 24-hour full-service fire station on campus. All buildings on campus have fire alarm systems and accessible fire extinguishers; many have smoke detection and automatic sprinkler systems. In addition, fire drills are conducted on a regular basis.

For non-emergency fire inquiries, you should contact the fire department serving your area:

MSU Campus (East Lansing Fire Department) 351-4220
East Lansing Fire Department 351-4220
Lansing Fire Department 483-4200
Meridian Township Fire Department 349-1742

For medical emergencies, clinics and local hospitals provide professional
help to the University community, guests, and visitors. The East Lansing Fire Department operates a full paramedic rescue unit 24 hours a day from the campus station. Additionally, the Ingham County Sheriff's Office provides 24-hour paramedic services. Paramedic services are provided during athletic and other special events.

Local emergency rooms:

Sparrow Hospital Emergency – Main Campus 364-4120
Sparrow Hospital Emergency - Saint Lawrence Campus 364-7000
Ingham Regional Medical Center Emergency (Greenlawn) 334-2286

EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EVACUATION PROCEDURES

The University is dedicated to providing a safe and secure environment for students, faculty, staff, visitors and guests.  The MSU Police maintain comprehensive information about the University’s general emergency management process on its website at http://www.police.msu.edu/.  Emergency management information regarding violence involving firearms or other weapons is available on the police website at http://www.police.msu.edu/resources/eminfo.pdf.

The MSU Police have established the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP), which describes the University’s emergency management organization, policies and response guidelines.  The EOP is based on the guidance provided by the National Incident Management System.  The plan sets forth a systematic approach for managing emergencies that threaten the health and safety of the campus community or disrupt its programs or activities.

The MSU Chief of Police or his designee (acting through the Vice President for Finance and Operations as delegated by the President) serves as the Emergency Management Coordinator and is responsible for directing the emergency management efforts.  The EOP identifies other departments, units, and individuals responsible for providing emergency response and critical support services, and describes their respective roles and responsibilities.

The EOP describes the process the MSU Police use to confirm that there is a significant emergency.  The Emergency Management Coordinator assesses the danger and potential threat the event may pose to the safety of the campus community, and determines the appropriate course of action in light of the specific circumstances.  In the event of an emergency, the Coordinator, without delay and taking into account the safety of the campus community, determines whom to notify, determines the content of the notification, and initiates the notification system, unless it is determined that the notification will compromise efforts to assist victims or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency.

As outlined on the MSU Police website, the University has a variety of ways of disseminating emergency information to the larger community, including the following:

Emergency Response and Evacuation Testing Procedures

The University has Emergency Action Teams and plans for each building on campus.  Each team receives extensive training on how to implement the evacuation and sheltering plans for its building.

Evacuation and sheltering drills are conducted annually in academic buildings in or near the month of May.  The residential halls conduct a minimum of eight (8) evacuation and sheltering drills between the months of September and April each year.  All drills are announced in advance to allow for the safety of those involved.  On occasion, unannounced drills occur due to unanticipated activation of the evacuation alarm systems.

Evacuation and sheltering plans and procedures are available at www.police.msu.edu under the Homeland Security tab.  The MSU Police Emergency Management Unit maintains records of drills, documenting the date, time, and description of the exercise, as well as whether it was announced or unannounced.  These records are available by request.

MISSING STUDENT NOTIFICATION POLICY

In compliance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act, the University has established a Missing Student Notification Policy that describes the formal notification procedures to be followed when a student residing in on-campus housing has been reported missing for more than 24 hours.  The Missing Student Notification Policy is available at http://reg.msu.edu/ROInfo/HEOAnotices.asp.

At the time of initial registration, all students are requested to provide the Office of the Registrar with the name and contact information of a personal emergency contact person(s).  This information is maintained in a Personal Emergency Contact System and is designated as confidential.  Only authorized campus officials, including the Director of Residence Life and officers in the MSU Police Department, are provided this information in the furtherance of the missing student investigation.  The University encourages all students to provide personal emergency contact information.

Incidents of missing students at the University should be reported immediately to the MSU Police Department.  Upon receipt of a report of a missing student who resides in on-campus housing, the MSU Police contact the Director of Residence Life and initiate an investigation.  If the MSU Police make a determination that a student has been missing for more than 24 hours and has not returned to campus, the MSU Police will contact the person(s) the student designated in the Personal Emergency Contact System.  If the missing student is under 18 years of age and not emancipated, the student’s custodial parent or legal guardian is contacted.

The MSU Police Department actively investigates all reports of missing students.  The investigation is conducted pursuant to established policies and procedures of the MSU Police Department.

CRIME PREVENTION EDUCATION AND AWARENESS

The MSU Police pursue crime reduction by conducting sexual assault and personal safety seminars aimed at risk avoidance and crime prevention.  These seminars are regularly scheduled in the residence halls and may be requested by groups at any time by contacting the MSU Police.  The MSU Police also publish and distribute personal safety awareness brochures that may be obtained by contacting DPPS, 1120 Red Cedar Road, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, or calling (517) 353-8502.

MSU Police officers speak at every Parent Orientation Program and to all new freshmen at required orientation sessions before the start of each fall semester.  Information about personal and property safety, crime awareness, emergency procedures, and police resources is distributed to students through Spartan Life, the MSU Student Handbook, on bulletin boards in every residence hall, in orientation newsletters, housing newsletters, and the campus newspaper, The State News.

Community Team Policing officers also coordinate and support citizen programs such as "Campus Watch" and "Lot Watch" which are staffed by student and employee volunteers.

SEXUAL ASSAULT EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

The MSU Sexual Assault Program provides immediate crisis intervention and advocacy services to women and men who have been impacted by rape or sexual assault as well as proactive sexual assault prevention education programming for MSU community members.  Services available include: a 24-hour hotline; medical advocacy; counseling and legal advocacy.  These services are available to survivors of sexual assault and their non-offending significant others.  The Counseling Center also offers follow-up counseling services to MSU students.
The prevention education programming offered consists of sexual violence awareness presentations and multi-session workshops to the University community.  Topics include: rape 101; myths and facts; consent; rape culture; drug facilitated sexual assault; risk reduction.  Programs are designed specifically for the classroom, residence halls, and the sorority/fraternity system.  Examples of programs recently offered include:

STUDENT RESOURCE SURVIVAL GUIDE

The Student Resource Survival Guide lists a number of resources that are available to those who have been victims of sexual assault and/or relationship violence.  The Guide also contains the following information about reporting sexual assault and/or relationship violence, and what do if you have been the victim of sexual assault and/or relationship violence.

REPORTING

To file a complaint against an MSU student:

MSU students may consider utilizing the University’s disciplinary process to report incidents of violence or harassment.  The student judicial process is separate from the criminal justice system and, as such, can provide greater privacy and a less adversarial process than that which is found in courts of law.  The student judicial process is contained in the Academic Freedom Report for Students, located in Spartan Life.  In that process, both the accuser and the accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during any disciplinary proceedings.  Both the accuser and the accused will be informed of the outcome of any proceeding.  During any sexual assault complaint proceeding, the University has a wide range of latitude when determining sanctions.  Those sanctions may range from warning to suspension from the University.

For more information, please call the Department of Student Life at (517) 432-2471, or visit its website at: www.studentlife.msu.edu/current_students/judicial_affairs/report.htm

To file a complaint against an MSU employee:

MSU students who have been harassed by or have been the victim of violence by a University employee have a variety of options at their disposal.  For a review of your circumstances, and an opportunity to explore options, call the University’s Ombudsman at (517) 353-8830 or visit www.msu.edu/unit/ombud.

IMMEDIATE CONSIDERATIONS IF YOU HAVE BEEN ASSAULTED OR HARASSED

Relationship/Domestic Violence:

Sexual Assault:

VICTIM SUPPORT SERVICES

The University is committed to easing the feelings of vulnerability that a person may experience as a victim or witness of a crime, and to ensuring that he or she is treated with consideration, respect, and sensitivity.  To this end, the Student Resource Survival Guide lists a number of resources that are available to those who have been victims of sexual assault and/or relationship violence.  Additionally, the “Michigan State University Police Sexual Assault Response Guarantee" outlines victim rights to a serious and respectful response from the MSU Police during the filing of a sexual assault report.

If a MSU student who is a survivor of sexual assault or relationship violence requests a change in his or her living arrangements or academic schedule, the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Services will assist the student.  In conjunction with the Department of Housing and the Office of the Provost, the Vice President will make changes to the student’s living or academic arrangements, as long as those changes are reasonably available and consistent with University policy.

A person who has witnessed or been a victim of a crime may apply for assistance through the State Crime Victims Compensation Board (373-7373) or the Ingham County Prosecutor's Office.  The assistance available includes a variety of counseling, advocacy, and support services.

THE LAW AND UNIVERSITY POLICIES

To provide for the safety of members of the University community and the protection of University property, Michigan State University has set minimum standards of conduct. Detailed information may be found in University Ordinances, General Student Regulations, and other University policies.  These University standards of conduct do not replace, or relieve persons from complying with, the requirements of civil or criminal laws.  Unlawful behavior may result in criminal prosecution as well as University disciplinary action.

CAMPUS FACILITIES

University facilities are well maintained and their security is given regular attention. Many cultural and athletic events held in University facilities are open to the public. Other facilities, such as the bookstore, library, and residence hall convenience stores, are also open to the public.  Access to academic and administrative facilities on campus is generally limited to students, employees, and visitors who are present to conduct University business.

Administrative buildings are generally open from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and academic buildings generally are open from 7:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m.  Academic buildings are scheduled to be open on weekends only as needed. Building access hours are posted on each facility.  Access to individual classrooms, laboratories, and programs is limited to those enrolled.  Access to University residence halls is limited to residents and their invited guests, as explained on signs posted on the doors and elsewhere in the living areas.

Landscaping and outside lighting on campus is designed for pedestrian safety and security.  Sidewalks are designed to provide well-traveled, lighted routes from parking areas to buildings and from building to building.  Landscape personnel trim shrubs from sidewalks, walkways, and building entrances to enhance lighting and visibility.

Campus walkways are inspected regularly to ensure adequate lighting and replacement of burned-out lights.  The "Green Light" Emergency Telephone System follows major walkways.  Maps showing the walkways and emergency telephones are available on the MSU Police web page, www.police.msu.edu, at the Department of Police and Public Safety Building, 1120 Red Cedar Road, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, or by calling (517) 355-2222 or (517) 353-8502.

RESIDENCE HALL SECURITY

Undergraduate residence halls are locked by midnight each night. Residents entering after closing hours must show a valid hall ID card. Guests that do not live in the hall but are members of the MSU community must show a picture ID and must be accompanied by a resident of the building at all times. Non-MSU affiliated guests must submit a picture ID to the Night Receptionist (which can be picked up when leaving the building) and must also be accompanied by a resident of the building at all times. Each resident is limited to three guests. The residents agree to comply with these procedures and not to admit unauthorized people into the halls.

CRIME INFORMATION AND STATISTICS

The MSU Police prepare a daily "blotter" indicating “calls for service” which is available to members of the media and public at 1120 Red Cedar Street, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, and on the MSU Police’s web page, www.police.msu.edu.  This log identifies the type and time of each criminal incident reported to the MSU Police.  The State News (student newspaper), the Lansing State Journal (local newspaper), and local television and radio stations contact the MSU Police's Information Officer to acquire information from this log.

Criminal statistics are reported to the Michigan State Police for transmittal to the Federal Bureau of Investigation.  The information is published in the annual publications Crime in Michigan and Crime in the United States, available at all public libraries and most law enforcement agencies within the United States.  Information may also be obtained at the following web sites:  www.fbi.gov/ucr/ucr.htm, http://www.michigan.gov/msp/0,1607,7-123-1645_3501_4621---,00.html, and www.campussafety.org.
The MSU Police’s Information Officer may be contacted at 87 Red Cedar Road, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, or by calling (517) 353-8502.

Information concerning the Michigan Public Sex Offender Registry can be located at http://www.mipsor.state.mi.us/ or through MSU Police.

TIMELY WARNING POLICY STATEMENT

The MSU Chief of Police is responsible for determining whether criminal activity reported to the MSU Police or other campus security authorities represents a threat to students, employees, or visitors.  When the MSU Police determine that there may be a threat to the health or safety of students, employees, or visitors, they will provide a timely warning to the appropriate individuals and groups in a manner that is likely to aid in the prevention of similar crimes.  Timely warnings are only issued in the event that a Clery reportable crime occurs on or near University property.       
The particular method of communication by which the timely warning is provided varies depending on the specific circumstances of the crime and the potential threat to safety.  Timely warnings may be issued by mass e-mail sent to students, faculty and staff informing of the crime.  An announcement of the crime may be posted on the MSU Police website at www.police.msu.edu.  The University may also make formal press releases to various media outlets in the surrounding area.  Depending on the incident, particularly in situations that pose an immediate threat to the community, the MSU Police will coordinate with the Division of University Relations to post a notice on the Michigan State University web site at www.msu.edu.

CHARTS OF STATISTICS

This section includes four charts.  Chart I and Chart II show the number of crimes reported to have occurred at Michigan State University and certain areas near the University for the calendar years 2006, 2007, and 2008.  Chart I contains statistics for all Clery reportable crimes excluding hate crimes.  Chart II contains statistics only for hate crime offenses.  The statistics include all reported crimes, not just those crimes determined to have actually occurred.

Chart III shows the number of arrests for liquor, drug, and illegal weapons law violations for 2006, 2007, and 2008.  Crime statistics related to property within the Charter Town-ship of Meridian, City of East Lansing, Lansing Township, and City of Lansing are included in Charts I, II, and III of this report.

Chart IV shows the number of students and employees referred for campus disciplinary action for conduct that would constitute a liquor law violation, a drug law violation, or a weapons law violation, as well as a violation of University regulations.  Not all individuals referred for campus disciplinary action were found to have committed the rules violation with which they were charged.  These statistics do not include students and employees who were also arrested for such violations; that information is included in Chart III.

Each chart provides information about the location where the alleged crime, arrest, or incident resulting in disciplinary action occurred.  For purposes of all four charts below, the following definitions apply:

Chart I
Criminal Offenses

 

CRIMES REPORTED1

Year

TOTAL ON CAMPUS (Includes CRF)

CAMPUS RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES ("CRF")

NON-CAMPUS BUILDING OR PROPERTY2

PUBLIC PROPERTY ADJACENT TO CAMPUS

Murder & Non-negligent Manslaughter   

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

Negligent Manslaughter

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0   
0   

Forcible Sex Offenses

2008
2007
2006

8
18
14

6
10
11

0
0
2

1
3
2

Non-forcible Sex Offenses

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

Robbery

2008
2007
2006

4
11
6

1
1
1

0
0
1

4
2
1

Aggravated Assault

2008
2007
2006

11
10
13

3
3
6

0
0
1

13
1
0

Burglary

2008
2007
2006

142
122
161

79
72
101

1
11
34

0
0
0

Motor Vehicle
Theft

2008
2007
2006

13
9
8

0
0
0

0
0
4

3
3
0

Arson

2008
2007
2006

2
1
3

1
0
1

0
1
1

5
3
0

1The charts of crime statistics include statistics gathered from the MSU Police, campus officials with significant responsibility for student and campus activities, and local law enforcement agencies, including the City of East Lansing, Charter Township of Meridian, Lansing Township, and City of Lansing.

2The category of "non-campus building or property" includes crime statistics for off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by associated student groups. It also includes crime statistics for non-contiguous buildings or property used by the University in direct support of its educational purposes, such as in MSU Dubai, the College of Human Medicine in Grand Rapids, and the College of Osteopathic Medicine in Detroit and Macomb. The column does not include statistics for other privately owned buildings or property off-campus.

Chart II
Hate Crime Offenses

CRIMES REPORTED3

Year

TOTAL ON CAMPUS (Includes CRF)

CAMPUS RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES ("CRF")

NON-CAMPUS BUILDING OR PROPERTY4

PUBLIC PROPERTY ADJACENT TO CAMPUS

Murder & Non-negligent Manslaughter   

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

Negligent Manslaughter

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0   
0   

Forcible Sex Offenses

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
1 (SO)

Non-forcible Sex Offenses

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

Robbery

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

Aggravated Assault

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

Burglary

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

Motor Vehicle
Theft

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

Arson

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

Larceny-theft*

2008
2007
2006

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

Simple Assault*

2008
2007
2006

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

Intimidation*

2008
2007
2006

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

Destruction,
Damage, or
Vandalism of Property*

2008
2007
2006

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

0
N/A
N/A

Other Crimes Involving Bodily Injury

2008
2007
2006

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

3The charts of crime statistics include statistics gathered from the MSU Police, campus officials with significant responsibility for student and campus activities, and local law enforcement agencies, including the City of East Lansing, Charter Township of Meridian, Lansing Township, and City of Lansing.

4The category of “non-campus building or property" includes crime statistics for off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by associated student groups.  It also includes crime statistics for non-contiguous buildings or property used by the University in direct support of its educational purposes in MSU Dubai, the College of Human Medicine in Grand Rapids, and the College of Osteopathic Medicine in Detroit and Macomb.  The column does not include statistics for other privately owned buildings or property off-campus.

*Note: Effective August 14, 2008, the Higher Education Opportunity Act added the crimes of larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction, damage, or vandalism of property to the list of crimes that must be reported in hate crime statistics.  These hate crimes were not Clery reportable incidents prior to 2008.  The statistics for these hate crimes will not appear in the U.S. Department of Education’s Web-based Campus Crime and Security Survey until August, 2010.

Chart III
Arrests
Liquor, Drug, Weapons Law Arrests

 

YEAR

TOTAL ON CAMPUS

CAMPUS RESIDENTIAL

NON-CAMPUS BUILDING OR PROPERTY

PUBLIC PROPERTY
ADJACENT TO CAMPUS5

Liquor Law

2008
2007
2006

924
875
926

304
190
292

0
0
0

297
0
0

Drug Law

2008
2007
2006

91
102
103

20
58
55

0
0
1

137
2
3

Illegal Weapons Possession

2008
2007
2006

14
28
16

3
14
7

0
0
0

24
0
0

5The East Lansing Police Department has changed its records management system.  The 2008 statistics for arrests for illegal weapons possession and substance law violations occurring on public property adjacent to campus now include individuals who were arrested and those who were issued citations to appear before a court. 

Chart III
Arrests
Liquor, Drug, Weapons Law Arrests

 

YEAR

TOTAL ON CAMPUS

CAMPUS RESIDENTIAL

NON-CAMPUS BUILDING OR PROPERTY

PUBLIC PROPERTY  ADJACENT TO CAMPUS

Liquor Law

2008
2007
2006

176
125
126

176
125
126

0
0
0

0
0
0

Drug Law6

2008
2007
2006

139
144
126

138
142
126

0
0
0

0
0
0

Illegal Weapons Possession

2008
2007
2006

7
3
3

7
3
3

0
0
0

0
0
0

6Individuals who were referred for disciplinary action for violating drug and liquor laws during a single incident are counted only under the referrals for drug law violations because such violations are considered to be the more serious offense.  Only the most serious offense is counted when multiple offenses are committed during a single incident. 

Additional information about the first three charts may be obtained from the MSU Police. Additional information about the fourth chart is available at the Department of Student Life, Division of Student Affairs and Services, and the Offices of Human Resources and Academic Human Resources.

POLICY ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT

The University Policy on Sexual Harassment applies to all members of the University community - faculty, staff, and students.  This Policy defines prohibited behavior and outlines procedures for complaining about sexual harassment, including with whom to file a complaint.  Offices providing information regarding sexual harassment are listed in Section IV.A. of the Policy.  Additional regulations specifically addressing student behaviors related to sexual harassment can be found in Spartan Life.

MSU DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY

Michigan State University's compliance with provisions of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 applying to students is achieved through a comprehensive alcohol and other drug prevention program, which includes policy enforcement, education programs, and treatment services.

The MSU Drug and Alcohol Policy applies to all members of the University community - faculty, staff, and students.  The policy defines prohibited behavior and outlines consequences for violations.  Also described are educational and counseling resources.  Additional regulations specifically addressing student behaviors related to alcohol and other drugs can be found in Spartan Life.

As outlined more fully in the policy, General Student Regulations 2.06 and 2.07 prohibit the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students on Michigan State University property or as part of any of its activities.  Consistent with state and federal law, Michigan State University maintains a workplace free from the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of a controlled substance.  The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of controlled substances, illicit drugs, and alcohol are prohibited on any property under the control of and governed by the Board of Trustees of Michigan State University, and at any site where work is performed by individuals on behalf of Michigan State University.

ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS

Olin Health Center
Health Education Services

353-0718

Olin Health Center’s Health Education Services is committed to reducing the harm associated with alcohol and drug use, and cultivating an environment in which moderate use is perceived and practiced as the norm.  Prevention efforts reflect a philosophy that students are capable of making wise decisions about their own alcohol and drug use and the role of Olin Health Education is to provide the education, support and advocacy necessary to help students do just that.

To that end, Olin Health Education has been involved with a social norms campaign, in conjunction with the College of Communication Arts and Sciences, to promote a better understanding of alcohol use by the MSU student population in order to challenge myths and misperceptions.

Olin Health Education provides education in classrooms, residence halls, sororities and fraternities by request and has a variety of information available to both on and off-campus students, Resident Mentors, staff and faculty, regarding alcohol and other drugs, including tobacco.

The ATOD specialist on staff is also available as a consultant to parents, concerned friends, mentors and staff/faculty who may have concerns about a student’s use.  The ATOD specialist will also provide brief counseling and referral services to students who are concerned about their own use of alcohol and drugs.

Finally, the ATOD office works with community groups, student groups, city officials and campus decision-makers to advise on policies related to health and safety issues associated with alcohol, tobacco and other drug use.

MSU Counseling Center
355-8270 or 355-2310

The MSU Counseling Center provides the following services:

Requests for services that are secondary to alcohol or other drug related legal involvement such as driving under the influence or drug possession/trafficking are referred to service providers in the community.

ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG RESOURCES FOR FACULTY AND STAFF

MSU Employee Assistance Program
355-4506

The Employee Assistance Program provides education, assessment and referral for persons concerned about alcohol or substance dependency for themselves or family members.

HEALTH RISKS AND MEDICAL CONSEQUENCES OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE

For the user, abuse of alcohol and illegal drugs presents significant health risks and medical consequences:

Users of other types of drugs face these serious problems:

Of course, there are psychological and social consequences of drug abuse as well, including loss of intimacy, friends, job, and marriage; creation of a dysfunctional family system; and heightened feelings of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, guilt, and loneliness.

FEDERAL AND STATE PENALTIES FOR DRUG SALE AND POSSESSION

The federal government decides if and how a drug should be controlled.  Psychoactive (mind-altering) chemicals are categorized according to Schedule I to V.  This schedule designates if the drug can be prescribed by a physician and under what conditions. Factors considered in this categorization include a drug's known and potential medical value, its potential for physical or psychological dependence, and risk, if any, to public health.  Penalties for the illegal sale or distribution of a drug are established using the designation of Schedule I to V.

Schedule I drugs have a high potential for abuse with no medical uses.  Production of these drugs is controlled.  Examples include GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyrate), heroin, methaqualone, all hallucinogens (except phencyclidine [PCP]), marijuana, and hashish. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), depending on its form, can also be a Schedule II drug.

Schedule II drugs have high potential for abuse, but have some medical uses.  Production of these drugs is controlled.  Examples include opium, morphine, codeine, other narcotics, barbiturates, cocaine, amphetamines, and phencyclidine (PCP).

Federal and State of Michigan penalties for selling Schedule I and II drugs vary with the quantity of the drug.  Additionally, if death, rape, or serious injury is associated with the sale and/or if it is a second offense, penalties are more severe.  When establishing penalties for sale, marijuana and hashish are separated from this designation according to the schedule.  The penalties for sale of marijuana and hashish, however, are similar to those set for Schedule I and II drugs.

The federal penalty for first offense sale of small amounts of Schedule I and II drugs is imprisonment for not less than 5 years and not more than 40 years; if death or serious injury results, the penalty changes to imprisonment for not less than 20 years or more than life, a fine of not more than $2 million for an individual, or both.  Federal penalties on first offense for individuals who illegally manufacture, deliver, or knowingly possess GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyrate) include imprisonment for up to 20 years.  If death or serious bodily injury results from the usage of GHB, penalties include imprisonment for no less than 20 years, and no greater than life, including additional fines of up to $1,000,000 for an individual and $5,000,000 if the defendant is other than an individual, or both.

The State of Michigan's penalty for “unlawful manufacture, delivery, or possession with intent to deliver” less than 50 grams of a Schedule I or II controlled substance or narcotic drug is a felony which results in imprisonment for up to 20 years, and/or a fine of up to $25,000 and is a felony.  Use of a Schedule I or II controlled substance or narcotic drug is a misdemeanor that has a penalty of imprisonment for up to one year, a fine of up to $2,000, or both.  Michigan law provides for up to 7 years imprisonment and/or a $10,000 fine for individuals who manufacture, deliver, intent to deliver, or knowingly possess GHB.

The manufacture, distribution, or possession with intent to distribute or dispense up to 45 kilograms of marijuana or between 20-200 marijuana plants is punishable by up to seven years imprisonment, a fine of up to $500,000 for an individual, or both.  In Michigan, the “unlawful manufacture, delivery, or possession with intent to deliver” of less than 5 kilograms of marijuana or a mixture containing marijuana, or fewer than 20 marijuana plants, is a felony, punishable by imprisonment for up to four years, a fine of up to $20,000, or both.  Possession of marijuana is a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment for up to one year, a fine of not more than $2,000, or both.  Use of marijuana is also a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment for not more than 90 days, a fine of up to $100, or both.

Schedule III, IV, and V drugs include those most citizens would categorize as "prescription drugs".  Schedule III drugs have some potential for abuse, but less than those on Schedules I and II. The potential for abuse of Schedule IV drugs is less than those on Schedule III, and the potential for abuse of those on Schedule V is less than those on Schedule IV.  All Schedule III to V drugs have medical uses and their production is not controlled.  Examples of these drugs include some narcotics, chloral hydrate (IV), barbiturates (III & IV), benzodiazepines (IV), glutethimide (III), other depressants (III & IV), amphetamines (III), and other stimulants (III & IV).

The federal penalty for first offense sale of a Schedule III drug is imprisonment for not more than five years, a fine of not more than $250,000 for an individual, or both.  The federal penalty for first offense sale of Schedule IV drugs is imprisonment for not more than three years, a fine of not more than $250,000 for an individual, or both.  The federal penalty for first offense sale of Schedule V drugs is imprisonment for not more than one year, a fine of not more than $100,000 for an individual, or both.

Sale of some Schedule III drugs is a felony in Michigan with a penalty of imprisonment for up to seven years, a fine up to $10,000, or both.  In Michigan, the sale of Schedule IV drugs is a felony with a penalty of imprisonment for up to four years, a fine up to $2,000, or both.  Sale of Schedule V drugs in Michigan is also a felony and has a penalty of imprisonment for up to two years, a fine of up to $2,000, or both.

VIOLATION

SUMMARY OF VIOLATION

SUMMARY OF POSSIBLE PENALTIES

OWI(drunk driving)

A person licensed or not, under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or both, driving in public place.

First offense: Misdemeanor, not more than 93 days in jail, and/or fine of $100-$500, and/or community service not more than 360 hours. As part of sentence, court may order suspension and/or restrictions of operator’s license.  Vehicle forfeiture or immobilization may also be required.  Up to six points may be added to driver record.

Permitting person under the influence to drive

Allowing intoxicated person
to drive in area open to the public.

Misdemeanor: not more than 93 days in jail, or fine not less than $100 or more than $500, or both; vehicle can be impounded.

Minor possessing or transporting in motor vehicle

Person under 21 years may not possess or transport alcohol in a vehicle

Misdemeanor: fine of not more than $100, and may be ordered to perform community service and undergo substance abuse screening and assessment at own expense; vehicle can be impounded for up to 30 days. License sanctions may also be imposed.

Impaired driving

A person driving in area open to public while impaired from alcohol, drugs, or both.

First Offense: One or more of following: community service for not more than 360 hours; imprisonment for not more than 93 days; fine of not more than $300; may be required to immobilize vehicle.  Restrictions on driver license may also be imposed.

Purchase/possession/ consumption by minor

Person under 21 years of age may not purchase, possess, or consume alcohol.

Misdemeanor: first arrest - fine of not more than $100, or court ordered diversion; second arrest - not more than $200,and/or up to 30 days imprisonment if in violation of probation due to preceding violation or for failure to follow court orders regarding preceding violation; third or subsequent violation - fine of not more than $500, and/or up to 60 days imprisonment if in violation of probation due to preceding violation or for failure to follow court orders regarding preceding violation.  May be ordered to participate in substance abuse prevention or substance abuse treatment and rehabilitation services. May be ordered to perform community service and undergo substance abuse screening and assessment at own expense.  Licensing sanctions may also be imposed.

Consumption on public highway/open alcohol in vehicle

No alcoholic beverage can be consumed on public highways; no alcohol item can be open, uncapped, or seal broken in passenger area of vehicle.

Misdemeanor: not more than 90 days in jail, a fine of not more than $100, or both.  May be ordered to perform community service and undergo substance abuse screening and assessment at own expense.  Licensing sanctions may also be imposed.

Disorderly person intoxicated

Intoxicated in public place and (1) danger to self or others, (2) causing disturbance.

Misdemeanor: not more than 90 days in jail, a fine of not more than $500, or both.

Minor consuming alcohol while driving

Person under 21 years who is driving cannot have any bodily alcohol content, which means an alcohol content of more than 0.02 grams but less than 0.08 grams per 100 ml of blood, per 210 liters of breath, or per 67 ml of urine. Requires screening and assessment to determine if there is likely benefit from alcohol education program.

First Offense: misdemeanor; a fine of not more than $250 and/or community service for not more than 360 hours.  Driver license may be restricted for 30 days.  Up to four points may be added to driver record. Refusal to take breathalyzer test is a two point civil infraction.

MSU ordinances

Use/possession of alcohol prohibited except as allowed by state law.

Not more than 90 days in jail, fine of not more than $100, or both.

SUSPENSION OF ELIGIBILITY FOR FINANCIAL AID FOR DRUG-RELATED OFFENSES

Federal law provides that a student who has been convicted of an offense under any federal or state law involving the possession or sale of a controlled substance shall not be eligible to receive any grant, loan, or work assistance during the period beginning on the date of such conviction and ending after the interval specified in the following table.

If convicted of an offense involving:

Possession of a Controlled Substance Ineligibility Period
First offense 1 year
Second offense 2 years
Third offense Indefinite
Sale of a Controlled Substance Ineligibility Period
First Offense 2 years
Second Offense Indefinite

A student whose eligibility has been suspended based on a conviction for possession or sale of a controlled substance may resume eligibility before the end of the ineligibility period if:

EAST LANSING ORDINANCES

East Lansing ordinances prohibit the possession of any alcoholic beverage in an open container or a container with a broken seal in any public place or private area open to the public, except a licensed liquor establishment or elsewhere as provided by ordinance. Partying and tailgating on public property with alcoholic beverages is prohibited within the City's jurisdiction.

City ordinances also prohibit the use of any type of false identification to enter a bar or to purchase liquor from a carry-out store and require liquor establishments to confiscate suspected false identification and turn it over to the Police Department.

Violations of all East Lansing ordinances except Minor in Possession of Alcohol (MIP) and Open Alcohol are punishable by a maximum sentence of 90 days in jail or a $500 fine or both. Penalty for Open Alcohol is a fine up to $100 for first violation.  For second and third violations, punishment is not more than 90 days imprisonment and/or fines up to $250, or $500.  Maximum penalties for MIP are up to $100 for a first violation, $200 and/or up to 30 days imprisonment for a second violation, and $500 and/or up to 60 days imprisonment for a third violation.  Possible community service and substance abuse screening at own expense, and/or driving license sanctions may also be imposed for Open Alcohol and MIP violations.

Persons unlawfully possessing marijuana or cannabis are guilty of a misdemeanor under City of East Lansing ordinances. Violations of marijuana or cannabis ordinances are punishable by a fine of up to $25, 45 days of community service, substance abuse screening or treatment, or some combination of these.  A second offense within ten years of the first raises the possible fines to $100, and potential community service days to 90. 

Students are encouraged to become familiar with their responsibilities under East Lansing ordinances, which may be obtained at East Lansing City Hall. East Lansing Ordinances may be obtained on the internet at http://www.cityofeastlansing.com.

MSU is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer